Tag: <span>droplets</span>

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Runners should be further than 1.5 meters apart

The evidence so far indicates that the virus is spread from person to person through small respiratory droplets. When a person sneezes, coughs or even exhales, he or she is emitting small droplets ―often too small to see with the naked eye―, that can carry the virus. The receiving persons can be infected by inhaling...

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Nose cells identified as likely COVID-19 entry points

Researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute (United States) have identified two specific types of cells in the nose as points of probable initial infection for the COVID-19 coronavirus. In their work, published in the journal Nature Medicine, they have found that goblet and cylindrical cells in the nose have high levels of the input...

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Surgical and N95 masks

The rapid global spread of SARS-CoV-2 and the resulting coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has led to urgent efforts to contain and mitigate transmission, leading to significant and widespread socioeconomic disruption. As of April 3rd 2020, over one million cases have been reported worldwide, as well as over 60,000 deaths, with ongoing spread in most parts...

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COVID-19 outbreak associated with air conditioning in restaurant

A new publication studies what happened in a restaurant and how air conditioning, an ordinary element in any place that serves food, could have helped infect at least nine people with COVID-19. This is the first work to suggest that air conditioning could play a role in COVID-19 transmission. The analyzed date took place on...

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Study reveals that airborne pathogen can last up to three hours

When the virus becomes suspended in droplets smaller than five micrometers ―known as aerosols― it can stay suspended for about a half-hour, researchers said, before drifting down and settling on surfaces where it can linger for hours (in the study’s experimental setup, the virus stayed suspended for three hours, but it would drift down much...