Tag: <span>vaccine</span>

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The first significant mutation of the SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus

Epidemiologists have been anxiously waiting for months for the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic to mutate. Apparently it already has. In this way, a new study claims to have found the first really significant mutation of the pathogen, and for now we can breathe easy. Virus mutations occur naturally as the pathogen jumps from...

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First patients injected in UK vaccine trial

The first human trial in Europe of a coronavirus vaccine has begun in Oxford with 1,100 people recruited for the study. Two volunteers were injected on Thursday, April 23rd and they will be monitored for 48 hours, before six more people enter the trial on Saturday and a larger number will join at the beginning...

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The coronavirus is mutating

According to Peter Thielen, a molecular biologist at the Johns Hopkins Laboratory of Applied Physics, SARS-CoV-2 is mutating. Among the thousands of samples of the long chain of RNA that makes up the coronavirus, there are 11 mutations that have become quite common. But as far as is known now, it is always the same...

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City size and COVID-19 attack rate

The current outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) poses an unprecedented global health and economic threat to interconnected human societies. Until a vaccine is developed, strategies for controlling the outbreak rely on aggressive social distancing. These measures largely disconnect the social network fabric of human societies, especially in urban areas. A new study estimates...

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Imperial College predicts that we will be able to go outside one in three months due to the coronavirus

There are two main challenges in assessing the severity of clinical outcomes during an epidemic of a newly emerging infection such as COVID-19. The first one ―surveillance―, is typically biased towards detecting clinically severe cases, particularly at the start of an epidemic when diagnostic capacity is limited (estimates of the proportion of fatal cases), the...

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Spain is working on two different COVID-19 vaccines

Spain is working on two different vaccines for COVID-19, from the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC). The first one is based on the smallpox vaccine and a gene that encodes a coronavirus protein has been introduced to it. This vaccine is safe in humans and therefore would go much faster to clinical trials. However,...

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Flattening the curve

The rapid growth rate in Italy has already filled some hospitals there to capacity, forcing emergency rooms to close their doors to new patients, hire hundreds of new doctors and request emergency supplies of basic medical equipment, like respirator masks, from abroad. In epidemiology, the idea of slowing a virus’ spread so that fewer people...

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Is herd immunity the solution?

If we have not been able to contain the COVID-19 pandemic we can at least wait for that point where we have all passed the disease and become immune. This is the strategy of the Government of Boris Johnson (United Kingdom) ―different from that of other countries―, to combat COVID-19. Although this is a tempting...

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Mapping the body’s immune response to COVID-19

Australian team of scientists maps body’s overall immune response to new COVID-19 disease for the first time. According to Katherine Kedzierska of the Peter Doherty Institute of Infection and Immunity at the University of Melbourne, the authors were able to see a really strong immune response that preceded clinical recovery (they noticed an immune response,...

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Chinese COVID-19 vaccine approved for clinical trials

A subunit vaccine gainst COVID-19 created by experts from the Academy of Military Medical Sciences (China) was approved for clinical trials. A subunit vaccine is a type of vaccine that contains only a fragment of the pathogen to stimulate a protective immune response, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). It is considered safer and...